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How our members of Congress voted on the spending bill - KATC.com | Continuous News Coverage | Acadiana-Lafayette

How our members of Congress voted on the spending bill

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Courtesy: MGN Online Courtesy: MGN Online

The second government shutdown in recent weeks ended hours after it began with a vote this morning by the House of Representatives. 

The 240-186 vote came at about 5:30 a.m.; the shutdown started at midnight. The Senate voted shortly after midnight, 71-28 in favor of the bill. 

This vote keeps the government running until March, and adds more than $600 million to the federal budget deficit. Part of the hold-up was a protest by Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, who called his colleagues hypocrites if they approved a huge deficit after spending so many years criticizing President Obama for budget deficits. Actually, the deficit decreased during Obama's terms, from $1.4 trillion in 2009 to $585 billion in 2016. 

Here's how Louisiana's Congressional delegation voted: 

U.S. Sen. Bill Cassidy voted no.

“Although every big spending deal in Congress has good with bad, the hope is that the good outweighs. In this bill, the bad outweighs," he said. "There are fake savings, it grows the size of government and significantly increases the deficit and debt.”

Cassidy spoke on the Senate floor earlier Thursday regarding the disaster relief provisions included in the deal. 

He also blasted Senate Democrats for holding long-term military funding hostage to jack up wasteful government spending.

U.S. Sen. John Kennedy voted no.

U.S. Rep. Steve Scalise voted yes, after tweeting his support yesterday: 

U.S. Rep. Cedric Richmond voted no. 

U.S. Rep. Clay Higgins voted yes. He posted a video on his Facebook page

"I will always vote my state and my district," he wrote. "The budget deal passed by both the House and Senate last night: 

- Restores America's military might, including a pay raise for active duty personnel.
- Provides disaster relief, including for Hurricane Harvey and Louisiana floods.
- Funds important flood mitigation and water management projects in Louisiana.
- Reauthorizes the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) for 10 years.
- Extends funding for Community Health Centers for 2 years."

U.S. Rep. Mike Johnson voted no, calling the bill "fiscal insanity."

“Three days ago, the House Republican majority sent a bill to the Senate that fully funded all our military needs and other critical priorities without additional, unnecessary increases in federal spending. Unfortunately, the Senate sent back a bill that will expand our government and increase the federal deficit by as much as $1 trillion in the next year alone," Johnson said. “Fiscal responsibility is a moral and national security imperative?, but politicians in Washington have voted to spend money they know we don't have, sending the giant, insurmountable tab to our children and grandchildren. At some point, Washington has to stop this endless cycle of out-of-control deficit spending. I believe this is an immoral and cowardly abdication of our responsibility."   

U.S. Rep. Ralph Abraham voted yes. He said he did so because of the military funding. 

"I understand and share the concerns about the debt. I would have written the bill differently, but our military needed long-term funding. Debt has consequences, but so does failing to provide our troops with the resources they need to defend us from our enemies while we sleep safely in our beds at night. I could never ask our men and women in uniform to fight for me knowing that I had voted against them," Abraham said. 

U.S. Rep. Garret Graves voted no. He posted a video on Twitter you can watch by clicking here

"The bill was going to end up resulting in about $500 billion in additional spending, we think it is probably going to result in an increase in federal spending by over $1 trillion dollars over the next several years," Graves said. "That's on top of the roughly $20 trillion debt that our country is facing today. This isn't monopoly money, this is literally mortgaging our children's future."

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