International

Jul 25, 2013 1:31 PM by AP(PHOTO COURTESY: MGN ONLINE)

Dubai rape dispute points to wider Islamic rules

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) - The couple stood before a Dubai judge. The charge was sex outside marriage - illegal in the United Arab Emirates and across nearly all the Muslim world - and the magistrate offered an option: Suspended sentences to the Pakistani man and Filipino woman if they agreed to wed. The man consented, but the woman refused. They are awaiting sentencing, which could bring jail terms of several months or longer.

The case in May grabbed some attention because of the judge's novel approach, but otherwise passed as a routine hearing on the misdemeanor docket in a city that relentlessly promotes itself as the new crossroads of the world.

Dubai's Islamic-influenced laws on sex, morality and how they are applied are now center stage in a global debate following the legal battle of a 24-year-old Norwegian woman, Marte Deborah Dalelv. She was sentenced to 16 months in prison on unwed sex and alcohol charges last week after claiming she was raped by a co-worker in March. The alleged attacker received a 13-month sentence on similar charges.

Both were pardoned Monday after Dalelv's sentence stirred an international outcry - which was furthered by the decision to waive the punishment for the 33-year-old Sudanese man.

Officials in the United Arab Emirates, however, stand by the sentences. They say the decisions were in line with local laws after Dalelv withdrew the rape allegation in the apparent belief that she could then simply reclaim her police-confiscated passport and leave the country.

It also underscores the contradictory and potentially baffling messages sent by places such as Dubai. Its tolerant atmosphere permits indulgences such as unlimited-booze brunches and lavish Valentine's Day getaways but spends far less energy on reminding foreigners that its laws are influenced by Islamic tenets that outlaw sex out of wedlock or even getting too amorous with your partner in public.

While enforcement is laissez-faire in Dubai - there are no active morality squads at work - the Dalelv case speaks to the wider contrasts across the region between what happens on the street, what is written in the law, and how much authorities warn visitors and foreign residents of the legal boundaries.

The potential for clashes could grow with places such as Abu Dhabi and Qatar's capital of Doha greatly expanding their international reach, including Doha hosting the 2022 World Cup. In countries that depend on tourism, such as Egypt and Jordan, the rising voices of Islamist groups could chip away at the traditional buffer given foreigners from laws about sex outside marriage.

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