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 Suncoast Emmy nomination for Trinity II coverage in 2011
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1 year ago

Suncoast Emmy nomination for Trinity II coverage in 2011

We are honored to announce KATC has received a Suncoast Emmy nomination for "continuing coverage".

Our news department is being recognized for our work covering the search for the missing workers aboard the liftboat "Trinity II" in 2011. Judges evaluated coverage from the moment the news broke of the crew's disappearance to interviews with the two Louisiana survivors months after the tragic accident.

The Emmy awards will be given out in Fort Lauderdale on December 1st. The entire 2012 Suncoast Emmy nomination list can be found at suncoastchapter.org.

To view our thirty minutes of coverage of the Trinity II, click HERE.

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2 years ago

Truth Behind Trinity II: Part Two

Most of us seek shelter when a violent storm hits our coast, but imagine being stuck out in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico tossed around by a tropical storm. This is what happened to ten offshore workers who had to abandon their vessel, the Trinity Two, in the Bay of Campeche two months ago during Tropical Storm Nate.

Four of the men were from Louisiana. After two days of battling strong winds and waves the worst of the weather finally passed over the crew of the Trinity Two. The men said they evacuated on Thursday and after battling 95 mile per hour winds and 30 foot waves, the weather finally cleared up on Saturday.

Captain Jeremy Parfait said, "it was hot. We were all blistered up. "

Parfait had already lost one member-Aaron Houweling. Houweling drifted away during one of the first nights. His crew was now cut down to eight and all of the men were getting physically and mentally exhausted, especially 32 year old Craig Myers.

Parfait said, "he would adjust his life jacket and wind up taking it off. He was just really confused."

Engineer Ted Derise Jr. said at one point he was sitting in the raft with Craig.

He explained, " I'm holding him and I have another guy with me. So us three were going to get out, and let the next three guys get in the raft. I said 'alright guys it's time for us to get out,' and when I looked he was just in the fetal position in the raft."

Derise, Nick Reed and Craig were all from New Iberia and had been good friends for years. Parfait says watching their friend die took a toll on everyone.

"We picked him up," Parfait said. "Nick and Ted got to him trying to administer CPR, jut trying to bring him back, but we couldn't get him back."

Derise added, "our goal after that was we got to get out of the water or we are all going to die."

Early Sunday morning, Derise spotted a platform in the distance. The four strongest men-Derise, Nick, Jeremy and another worker started swimming to it and left the other five men including Craig, who was tied inside the raft, behind.

Derise said, "as long as it took us to get that close. It took seconds for the seas to change and push us back out."

"I started drifting away and Nick also started drifting away, "Parfait said. "Me and him were just completely exhausted."

Almost at the point of giving up, Derise saw a boat in the distance.

Derise said, "I was like 'man I see a boat, I see a boat!' and he was like 'go to it man and tell them I'm right here-I can't move.' I didn't want to leave him, but I thought I have to at least try. The boat was seven or eight miles off."

Derise swam within 50 yards of the boat, but it turned away and started leaving.

"I never looked back at the boat," he said. " I focused on these little bitty fish. I was just playing or I think I wanted to eat one and then all of a sudden, I heard a noise and I looked up and there was a plane on top of me."

After more than three days in the water, he was finally rescued about 50 miles off the coast of Mexico. The men who were in the raft had been found four hours earlier. Ted pointed the coast guard in the direction of Parfait and Reed.

Parfait said, "between me going in and out of consciousness. We separated."

Reed's body was eventually recovered, he was one of four men who died. all four men died. Parfait said he was hours away from death himself. His lungs and kidneys were both failing by the time he reached the hospital.

Derise and Parfait are under doctor's care at their homes now, slowly recovering. Both are suffering from post traumatic stress syndrome among other things.

2 years ago

Oil Workers Describe Floating for Days in Gulf

HOUSTON (AP) - When waves as high as 40 feet disabled the 94-foot research vessel Jeremy Parfait and nine other oil workers were on in the Gulf of Mexico last month, he knew there was only one place they could go - into the water.
Their boat, which normally would be elevated above the water by several metal legs, had toppled in the tropical storm and was floating helplessly, beaten by waves and wind. The 10 men jumped into the Gulf and clung to a 6-foot-by-3-foot raft.
"We know we don't want to go in that water. I can see it in their eyes. They are scared to death. They don't want to go in that water. I don't want to go in that water," said Parfait, the boat's captain.
Parfait, 39, and Ted Derise Jr., 32, told The Associated Press on Friday that the ordeal was a nightmare in which they saw friends and co-workers slowly die. The workers abandoned their vessel Sept. 8 about eight miles off shore from Frontera in the southeastern Mexican state of Tabasco. It was nearly four days before they were rescued. Three died in the water, and a fourth died later at a hospital.
As the men floated, Mexico's state oil company, Petroleos Mexicanos, or Pemex, and the Mexican navy mounted a nearly 10,000-square-mile search by air and sea. Most were found just before noon Sept. 11 about 50 miles off the coast of the Mexican state of Campeche.
Derise and Parfait, who are from Louisiana, said they were pushed to the breaking point but never lost hope they would be rescued.
"When we hit the water, I kept telling them, `They are going to come find us,"' Parfait said.
Along with Derise and Parfait, four Mexican oil workers and a Bangladeshi were rescued alive. Craig Myers, 32, and, Nicholas Reed, 31, both from Louisiana, were found dead. The Bangladeshi man, Nadimuzzman Khan, later died of exposure in a Mexican hospital. The body of another worker, Aaron Houweling of Australia, who had floated away earlier, was found three days later.
Parfait said that when he realized they would have to abandon their vessel, a liftboat called the Trinity II, he wasn't worried because a standby ship about three miles away could come and get the workers. But he said that ship and another one that was also nearby never came.
Parfait, Derise and the family of Myers have filed a federal lawsuit in Houston against the companies involved in the operation, claiming they were abandoned. The companies being sued, including Geokinetics Inc., a Houston-based company that provides seismic data to the oil and gas industry; Trinity Liftboat Services, a Louisiana-based company that operated the liftboat and that Parfait and Derise work for, did not return telephone calls seeking comment Friday night.
In addition to Derise, Parfait, Myers, Khan, Reed and Houweling, the other workers were: Ruben Martinez Velasquez; Eleaquin Lopez; Luis Escobar; and Ruben Lopez Villalobos, four Mexican contract workers.
During the first and second nights in the Gulf, the men battled rain, massive waves and fatigue. Some began to fall asleep, losing their grip on ropes tied to the life raft.
Houweling drifted off on Sept. 9. By the time the others realized what had happened, he was too far away.
"It was pitch black. We couldn't see him. We swam after him for 2½ hours straight trying to get to him," Parfait said. "Everybody wanted to try and go and save him. I told them, `Just stop. Take a break. We'll look at him at daylight.' Everybody was just dead tired."
By daybreak on Sept. 10, there was no sign of him.
That day, the men, their tongues swollen and lips left raw by saltwater, decided to drink their own urine.
"We were just so thirsty," Derise said.
Myers had become disoriented. Later that evening, Derise was in the raft with Myers when he realized his friend had died.
Both Derise and Parfait cried as they recounted how they held their friend's body and decided to tie it to the raft so he wouldn't be left out to sea.
Early the morning of Sept. 11, the men spotted lights in the distance and realized it was a platform that was several miles away. Derise, Parfait, Reed and another worker tried to swim to it. Unable to reach it or get back to the raft, they floated together in the Gulf.
Around 7:30 a.m., they spotted a boat off in the distance. With Parfait and Reed disoriented, Derise and the other man headed toward the ship.
Derise said he swam for seven hours but couldn't get the ship's attention.
As he saw it leaving, he thought, "This is it. I'm going to die." But then he heard a noise, looked up and saw an airplane, which signaled it had seen him. The boat turned around and picked him up.
By that time, the men who had stayed with the raft had already been rescued.
Derise and Parfait said they are still dealing with psychological and medical issues from their ordeal.
"My wife wakes me up and I'm screaming. No matter what the dream is, I'm trying to get to them. The outcome is still the same. I can't change nothing," Parfait said.

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2 years ago

Oil workers describe floating for days in Gulf

HOUSTON (AP) - Two U.S. oil workers who survived floating for nearly four days on a life raft in the Gulf of Mexico after a tropical storm disabled their research vessel say they experienced a nightmarish ordeal in which they saw friends and co-workers slowly die.

Ted Derise Jr. and Jeremy Parfait told The Associated Press on Friday they were pushed to the breaking point but never lost hope they would be rescued.

But the men say they still have nightmares about what happened to them.

The two were among 10 workers who had to abandon their boat in the Bay of Campeche after it was crippled on Sept. 8 by Tropical Storm Nate. Four other workers survived, but four died, including two other Americans.

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2 years ago

Attorney Tells Details of Louisiana Offshore Workers Missing Days at Sea

The two Louisiana offshore workers who spent days missing in the Gulf of Mexico, struggling to stay alive, are slowly recovering. The ten men who abandoned their lift-boat were stranded at sea after Tropical Storm Nate tore through the Gulf.

It's been almost three weeks since the offshore workers got caught up in Nate's winds and waves off the coast of Mexico, but those horrific days will likely never leave the survivor's minds.

Attorney Francis Spagnoletti said, the ten men were a speck in the ocean without anyone having any clue about their location. Spagnoletti is representing three of the Louisiana workers.

He said the men faced 25 foot seas and had no food or water. After two days had passed, hypothermia set in for some of the men like 32 year old, Craig Myers, of New Iberia.

"They knew they were going into the water, so he put on extra clothes before they evacuated because they knew they were going to be in the water," Spagnoletti said.

By the end of the third day, Spagnoletti said Myers was clinging onto life.

"He started to become severely debilitated from the hypothermia, so they took him and put him in the raft," he said. "At the end of the third day, as I understand, he turned over and his face went into the water and he died."

The survivors' carried Myers body with them in the raft until they were rescued on day four. By the time they were found Nick Reed of New Iberia had drowned.

Spagnoletti said the survivors Ted Derise Jr. of New Iberia and Jeremy Parfait of Houma are recovering at home under doctor's care.

"It was pure will to live," he explained. "They kept reflecting and hallucinating back on their wives and their families."

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2 years ago

Lawsuits Filed by Workers Who Floated Days in Gulf

HOUSTON (AP) - Two oil workers who survived days floating on a life raft in the Gulf of Mexico after they evacuated their disabled vessel during a tropical storm have filed lawsuits claiming the workers were abandoned by another ship that could have taken them to safety.

The family of a third worker who died during the ordeal has also sued. The three men were among 10 oil workers on a liftboat in the Bay of Campeche who had to abandon the vessel on Sept. 8 after it was crippled by Tropical Storm Nate.

The workers' attorney, Francis Spagnoletti, said Friday that the men all suffered a harrowing ordeal that could have been prevented. Among other things, Spagnoletti said the workers had to float in shark-infested waters and drink their own urine.

The lawsuits were filed earlier this week in federal court in Galveston, southeast of Houston, by Ted Derise Jr. and Jeremy Parfait, two of the surviving workers, along with the family of Craig Myers.

The suits were filed against Geokinetics Inc., a Houston-based company that provides seismic data to the oil and gas industry; Trinity Liftboat Services, a Louisiana-based company that operated a liftboat, a type of vessel used by the workers and contracted by Geokinetics; and Mermaid Marine Australia Ltd., an Australian company that owns a standby vessel that operated near the liftboat.

Derise, Parfait and Meyers worked for Trinity and are from Louisiana.

Trinity Lifeboat Services declined to comment. Geokinetics and Mermaid Marine did not immediately return calls seeking comment.

However, during a conference call last week, Richard Miles, Geokinetics' CEO, said "safety is paramount" at his company.

"We have been primarily focusing our extensive efforts on our employees and on our partners' employees, which have been our first and foremost concern," Miles said.

Spagnoletti alleges that a standby ship that was in place to take the workers away in case of trouble left without them, knowing the liftboat had been crippled by the storm and the workers had already called for help. He said the standby ship was still in the area when the workers went into the water.

"The vessel didn't stand by. It just took off," he said, adding the workers should have been evacuated ahead of the storm.

Spagnoletti said the standby vessel left because its crew was getting seasick and wanted to go back to shore.

The men tried to open several inflatable rafts, he said, but high winds blew them away. The workers ended up with only one raft, which the attorney described as a "big life preserver" because it had an opening in the middle covered by netting.

The workers abandoned the liftboat about eight miles off shore of the port of Frontera in the southeastern Mexican state of Tabasco.

The raft wasn't big enough for all the workers, so some had to float in the water. Knowing they would have to be in the water, several of the workers, including Myers, put on extra clothing to protect themselves against cold temperatures, Spagnoletti said.

The men floated for three days without food or drink. One of the workers, Aaron Houweling of Australia, lost his grip on the raft within the first hours.

After being in the water for some time, Myers began developing hypothermia. The men pulled Myers into the raft, Spagnoletti said, but after three days, he died.

The men were found on Sept. 11, after floating for three days, about 50 miles off the coast of the Mexican state of Campeche. Pemex, Mexico's state oil company, and the Mexican navy led the search. Houweling's body was found three days later.

Along with Derise and Parfait, four Mexican oil workers and a Bangladeshi were rescued alive. Myers and another American were found dead. The Bangladeshi man later died in a hospital.

The lawsuits are asking for unspecified damages.

"This case is about making sure Craig Myers hasn't died in vain," Spagnoletti said. "Maybe something will be done so these guys aren't put in this kind of position in the future."

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3 years ago

Geokinetics Conference Call on Trinity II Tragedy

Geokinetics held a conference call this morning and shared information with media about the Trinity II tragedy in the Bay of Campeche.
Pres. and CEO Richard F. Miles said the body of the missing offshore worker from Australia was found yesterday. Aaron Houweling lost his grip within the first hours after abandoning the liftboat. He likely couldn't hold on from the force of Tropical Storm Nate's 12-foot waves and 110 mph winds, according to a navy admiral who oversaw the rescue operation.

On board the liftboat were three Geokinetics employees, three contractors, and four Trinity Liftboat employees. Trinity, of New Iberia, operated the liftboat.
Miles said this was a strong and rapidly developing storm that resulted in unusual weather conditions. He said safety is important to Geokinetics and they truly feel for all crew members and their families.

Geokinetics held a conference call this morning and shared information with media about the Trinity II tragedy in the Bay of Campeche.
Pres. and CEO Richard F. Miles said the body of the missing offshore worker from Australia was found yesterday. Aaron Houweling lost his grip within the first hours after abandoning the liftboat. He likely couldn't hold on from the force of Tropical Storm Nate's 12-foot waves and 110 mph winds, according to a navy admiral who oversaw the rescue operation.

On board the liftboat were three Geokinetics employees, three contractors, and four Trinity Liftboat employees. Trinity, of New Iberia, operated the liftboat.
Miles said this was a strong and rapidly developing storm that resulted in unusual weather conditions. He said safety is important to Geokinetics and they truly feel for all crew members and their families.

Funeral services for Trinity Liftboat Services employee, 32-year-old Craig Joseph Myers, will be at 1:00 PM Saturday, September 17, 2011 at Pellerin Funeral Home in New Iberia who died Friday, September 9. Funeral services for Trinity Liftboat Services employee, 31-year-old Nicholas Ray "Nick" Reed, will be at 11:00 am on Saturday, September 17, 2011 at the Church of Christ in New Iberia. Pastor Ken Wright will officiate. Interment will follow in Holy Family Cemetery.

To listen the conference call click here

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3 years ago

Funeral arrangements set for Craig Joseph Myers

Funeral services will be at 1:00 PM Saturday, September 17, 2011 at Pellerin Funeral Home in New Iberia, for Craig Joseph Myers, 32, who died Friday, September 9, 2011 .

Interment will follow in Memorial Park Cemetery .

Rev. Mark Derise will officiate.

Born on May 10, 1979 , Craig was a graduate of New Iberia Senior High, and worked as a crane operator for Trinity Lift Boats. He enjoyed cars, trucks, jet skies, four wheelers, but most of all spending time with his family and friends. Craig will be deeply missed.

Survivors include parents, Steve and Debra Waguespack Myers of New Iberia; grandparents, Nelton and Betty Myers of New Iberia; brother, Jason Myers of New Iberia; sister, Heather Frith and husband Scott of New Iberia; girl friend, Keisha Burke of New Iberia; nieces and nephews, Chet Ransonet, Chase Ransonet, Alicee Frith, Gracie Frith; godmother, Sherry Romero of New Iberia; godchild, Cruz Reed of New Iberia; several aunts, uncles, and cousins.

He was preceded in death by his grandparents, Dalton Waguespack, and Audrey Waguespack Prince; uncle, Keith Waguespack; and his close friend, Nicholas Reed.

Pallbearers will be Jason Myers, Scott Frith, Doug Romero, Chris Broussard, Bubba Babineaux, Cliff Burke, and Jarrod Waguespack.

Honorary pallbearers include Ted Derise, Jr., Jeremy Parfait, Scott Crochet, Ryan Ransonet, Brent Vice, Chet Ransonet, Chase Ransonet, Brennan Crochet, Brennan Cuccia, and Cory Hebert.

A gathering of family and friends will be Friday from 10:30 AM until 9:00 PM at Pellerin Funeral Home, 502 Jefferson Terrace Blvd , in New Iberia . A rosary will be prayed at 6:30 PM Friday. Visitation will continue Saturday from 8:00 AM until 1:00 PM .

Pellerin Funeral Home, 502 Jefferson Terrace Blvd., New Iberia, LA 70560, 337.365.3331, is in charge of arrangements.

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3 years ago

Funeral arrangements set for Nicholas Ray "Nick" Reed

NEW IBERIA - Funeral services will be held for Nicholas Ray "Nick" Reed, age 31, at 11:00 am on Saturday, September 17, 2011 at the Church of Christ in New Iberia. Pastor Ken Wright will officiate. Interment will follow in Holy Family Cemetery.

A gathering of family and friends will be held at Evangeline Funeral Home of New Iberia on Friday from 2:00 pm until 9:00 pm. Visiting will continue on Saturday at the Church of Christ, 667 Charles Street, from 10:00 am until time of services.

Nicholas Ray Reed was born January 10, 1980 to Randy and Jaime Reed. Nick, as he was known by family and friends, passed away on Sunday, September 11, 2011. Nick was a licensed Mate and worked with his father at Trinity Liftboat Services.

He was an avid sports fan who enjoyed football, baseball, and golf was a true Dallas Cowboys Fan. Nick also coached his son in the Vermilion Football League and Evangeline Little League. But his greatest love was the time spent with family and friends. Nick leaves a legacy of love and devotion and will be missed dearly.

Survivors include his fiancée, Monica Rae Romero; his sons whom he adored and loved dearly, Kaiden Sydney Reed and Cruz Cohen Reed; his father and mother, Randy and Jaime Reed; his sister and brother, C'na Reed and Seth Reed; maternal grandmother, Joyce Tortamus; and numerous aunts, uncles, cousins and friends.

He was preceded in death by his paternal grandparents, Boyce Ray Reed and Clara Shuler Reed; maternal grandfather, James "Jimmy" Vitter; and his best friend and godfather to his son, Craig Myers.

Serving as pallbearers will be Randy Reed, Johnny Reed, Bobby Wallace, Blake Chachere, Zach Louviere, Phil Livesay, Kenny Dupre, and Mike Reed. Honorary pallbearers will be Ted Derise, Jr., Jeremy Parfait, Seth Reed, Kyle Bourque, and Cliff Burke.

To view the online obituary, video tribute, and sign the guestbook, please visit www.evangelinefuneralhome.com

Evangeline Funeral Home of New Iberia (337) 364-1881 is in charge of arrangements.

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3 years ago

Trinity II Crew Shared Life Boat

Still no response tonight from Geokinetics on our repeated requests for information involving the Trintiy II evacuation. We have learned, from one of Mexico's daily newspapers, La Jornada, the 10-man crew took turns on the raft. The men who weren't in the raft were floating in the water and wearing life jackets tied to the raft. Five life jackets were shared amongst the stranded men.

Reports out of Mexico also say four people were alive on the raft when found including Kham Nanimuzzaman, from Bangladesh, Luis Manuel Escobar, Rubén Augusto Gómez Velásquez and Eleaquín Lopez, the latter three Mexicans. Also on the raft was the body of one of the Iberia Parish men, although that name has not been released. Outside the raft were Ted Derise Jr.of Iberia Parish, Rubén López Villalobos of Mexico, Jeremy Parfait of Houma, and the body of one of the Iberia Parish men.

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3 years ago

Oil Workers Survived Mexican Storm in Tiny Raft

CIUDAD DEL CARMEN, Mexico (AP) - A small, flat fiberglass raft was all 10 oil workers had to escape the leveling winds and towering waves of Tropical Storm Nate as it pounded their disabled rig in the Gulf of Mexico.

Capt. Jeremy Parfait of Louisiana radioed the final word to the Mexican shore on Thursday after the storm thrashed the Trinity II liftboat so badly, one of its three stabilizing legs broke, and the boat-turned-exploration platform tottered into the raging sea:

"We're going to lose communication. We're evacuating."

But as they went to deploy a sealed, inflatable life boat equipped with water, first aid and a tracking device, the high winds snatched it from the deck.

Three workers for Houston-based Geokinetics, Inc., three contractors and four Americans who made up the liftboat crew took to the rough seas in a flat, rectangular raft with an inflated perimeter, some tethered and half-submerged, grabbing onto side handles because all 10 wouldn't fit on board.

Australian oil worker Aaron Houweling lost his grip within the first hours, likely from the force of the 12-foot (4-meters) waves and 110 mph (177 kph) winds, according to a navy admiral who oversaw the rescue operation.

Rescuers were still searching for him Wednesday.

The other nine were tossed about in their tiny raft for three days without food or water, and were carried by high winds and seas 140 miles (222 kilometers) away from the hobbled Trinity II.

Rescue crews found the raft on Sunday still carrying four men. Three more survivors were found bobbing in life jackets less than a mile (a kilometer) away after being separated from the raft the day before.

But rescuers who mounted a nearly 10,000-square-mile (25,900-square-kilometer) search also recovered two bodies, one tethered to the raft and another still buoyed by a life jacket in the open sea.

Authorities identified the dead as Americans Nicholas Reed, 31, and Craig Myers, 32, both from the Iberia, Louisiana, area, where the liftboat company Trinity Liftboat Services in based. Reed, who drowned, is the son of company owner Randy Reed. Myers died of exposure.

One survivor, Bangladeshi oil worker Kham Nadimuzzaman, also died Monday of exposure after being transported to a hospital.

Pemex identified the other six as U.S. citizens Parfait and Ted Derise, also of Louisiana; and Mexican contract workers Ruben Martinez Velasquez, Eleaquin Lopez, Luis Escobar and Ruben Lopez Villalobos.

Navy and Geokinetics representatives who gave details of the rescue wouldn't say in which locations they were found. But they remained in a private hospital in Ciudad del Carmen on Wednesday, almost a week after an ordeal that left them dehydrated and sunburned, but mostly in good condition.

None wanted to talk immediately about what happened.

"They're aware. Lucid, obviously shocked by what happened," said Arioc Lopez, head of industrial security for Geokinetics, Inc. in Mexico. The U.S.-based company was on a seismic exploration mission for Petroleos Mexicanos, or Pemex, Mexico's state oil company.

Trinity Liftboat officials also have declined to comment so far on the tragedy.

Lopez told The Associated Press that the search began as soon as Parfait made the distress call from the Trinity II, a 94-foot (29-meter), 185-ton liftboat that that could sleep 28, was air-conditioned and had a dining room, laundry and TV lounge, according to the company website.

It could lower legs to the sea floor and then elevate itself above the water level and was being used as a recording vessel. It was in waters about 25 feet (eight meters) deep about eight miles (13 kilometers) offshore of the port of Frontera in the southeastern Mexican state of Tabasco.

Rescuers immediately sought help from Mexico's Estado Mayor, the equivalent of the Secret Service, borrowing a Super Puma helicopter to venture into the storm, said Adm. Joaquin Esteban Garcia-Perez Silva, commander of Mexican Naval Region III. The heavier craft could withstand high winds better than the navy models.

When the helicopter reached the Trinity II later Thursday afternoon, navy units descended to the rig and found it abandoned.

A video taken from the helicopter shows the boat swaying, but afloat, hours after workers jumped into the sea.

The search that followed covered the Bay of Campeche, an oil-rich area in the southern part of the Gulf off the coast of the Mexican state of Campeche.

The admiral said that between Thursday and Sunday, navy aircraft flew 97 hours, Pemex aircraft 60 hours, and navy ships 234 hours combined.

Finally, just before noon on Sunday, a ship contracted by Pemex for the rescue located the raft with four survivors on board and a body roped to the side, while a helicopter spotted two other survivors in the water.

Within a few hours, another ship spotted one more survivor and the second body.

Family members spoke very little about what happened.

"He was afraid of sharks," said Roman Cruz, uncle of Ruben Martinez Velasquez, who was the cook on the Trinity II.

Geokinetics is still investigating what happened in the Trinity II incident.

"Imagine: 72 hours without sleep, exhausted, without water, dehydrated and being battered by waves," Garcia-Perez said.

"They had luck ... and help," the admiral added, gesturing toward the sky.

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3 years ago

State Department Confirms Deaths in Trinity II Tragedy

The State Department is now confirming Nicholas Reed's death in the Gulf of Mexico. KATC previously reported on Craig Meyers' death after finding his obituary online and after not receiving answers and confirmation from the companies involved. State Dept. Spokesperson Megan Mattson confirms both Reed and Meyers died in the Gulf. The State Department has been in touch with their families and has offered appropriate assistance, according to Mattson. The other U.S. Citizens injured in the same incident, Ted Derise Jr. and Jeremy Parfait, are also confirmed by the State Dept. "To respect the privacy of the individuals and families involved, we have not further comment," Mattson said.

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3 years ago

Update: Trinity II, Two Local Deaths Reported

Still no update from officials, however the Mexican press is apparently getting updates on the deaths of two New Iberia men who were shipwrecked over the weekend. KATC has found no less than 10 publications with the same information, citing the Deputy of Justice in Carmen. We still have not gotten calls back from the Embassy, Consulate, and Geokinetics despite repeated calls and email exchanges.

According to the Mexican publications, Mexican officials have confirmed the deaths of two New Iberia men following Tropical Storm Nate. The Deputy of Justice in Carmen, Daniel Martínez Morales, said 31-year-old Nicholas Ray Reed died from asphyxia by submersion and 32-yearold Craig Joseph Myers died from shock cardiogenic by severe dehydration and starvation. Both bodies were given to the Consul of the United States based in Yucatán; he'll make sure both would later go on a private flight up the United States.

Also killed was 42-year-old Khan Nadimuzzaman of Bangladesh, who was rescued alive and was admitted unconscious in the hospital of Pemex, and who died several hours later. His cause of death was shock cardiogenic by severe dehydration and starvation.
The missing person has been identified as Aaron Wesley Houweling, of Australia.

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3 years ago

More on the "Trinity II"


KATC has further coverage on the story of the Louisiana Oil Workers in the Bay of Campeche. We have new details on the rescue and recovery and a first glimpse at those rescued who are now recovering in Mexico.
The crew was working on a "lift boat" owned by New Iberia's Trinity Liftboat services when Tropical Storm Nate formed Wednesday night. By the morning, the crew had evacuated in a covered life raft because of the weather and were not seen until Sunday morning.

After three days at sea, the crew was rescued 51 miles off the coast of Mexico. According the the Mexican Navy, five men were recovered in the raft, four of them still alive. The three other survivors were found in the water.

Among the survivors was Ted Derise, Jr. Of New Iberia and Jeremy Parfair of Houma. Both men survived, only having to be treated for sunburns and some bruises.

Tragically, among the dead was 32 year old Craig Myers of New Iberia. Funeral arrangements are currently pending at Pellerin Funeral Home. Family members fondly remember him and say he enjoyed cars, trucks, jet skies, a four wheelers, but most of all, he enjoyed spending time with his family and friends.

One of the ten workers is still missing off the coast of Mexico. Nick Reed, also from New Iberia, has still not been located at this time.

Reed's dad, Randy, and president of Trinity Liftboat Services is now in Mexico.

KATC is still trying to attain more information about the investigation at this time.

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3 years ago

Updated Timeline from Geokinetics

Updated Timeline From Geokinetics

  • Tropical Storm Nate approached Bay of Campeche Wednesday evening September 7, 2011
  • Thursday morning, September 8, 2011 Geokinetics learns of disabled liftboat
  • Thursday, around noon, the liftboat captain communicated crew was abandoning the liftboat and boarding a life raft
  • Search for ten people -- four Trinity crewmembers, three Geokinetics employees and three independent contractors
  • Weather conditions improved Friday afternoon
  • Several boats, five helicopters and one plane mobilized Friday afternoon
  • Weather has improved significantly as of Saturday morning, September 10, 2011 allowing rescue efforts to intensify
  • Trinity II has been secured and it was confirmed, as reported, that the crew did indeed abandon the liftboat
  • Mexican marine authorities announced Sunday, September 11, 2011 that seven surviving crew members were rescued 51 miles off the coast of Campeche State
  • Surviving crew members were transported to a hospital in Mexico, and sadly one of them has since passed away
  • The bodies of two of the crew members who did not survive were recovered
  • The search continues for the one remaining crew member still missing

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3 years ago

6 oil workers rescued in Gulf of Mexico are stable

CIUDAD DEL CARMEN, Mexico (AP) - Six oil workers who were rescued alive after floating for three days in the Gulf of Mexico are stable and conscious, though suffering from bumps and bruises and sunburn after weathering a tropical storm, a doctor overseeing their treatment said Monday.

All were transferred from a hospital run by Mexico's state oil company, Petroleos Mexicanos, or Pemex, to a private clinic. One survivor transferred in a wheelchair was asked how he was feeling and he responded, "Good."

A Pemex official also said Bangladeshi oil worker Kham Nadimuzzaman died in the hospital after being rescued. Two other workers were found dead and rescue crews continued the search for the last of the 10 workers.

The official could not be named because he was not authorized to speak to the news media. Authorities have not given a cause of death or identified the bodies.

Nadimuzzaman was among 10 missing oil workers, seven of whom were found alive Sunday, three days after evacuating their disabled rig in a tropical storm and escaping in an enclosed life raft.

Pemex identified the survivors as two U.S. citizens, Jeremy Parfait and Ted Derise, Jr., both of Louisiana; and Mexicans Ruben Velasquez, Eleaquin Lopez, Luis Escobar and Ruben Lopez Villalobos.

They were found 50 miles (80 kilometers) off the coast of the Gulf state of Campeche by the ship Bourbon Artavaze and taken by helicopter to the Campeche port city of Ciudad del Carmen, where they were admitted to a Pemex regional hospital.

The fate of the other two Americans, identified previously as Louisiana residents Craig Myers and Nick Reed, was still not clear Monday.

The Mexican navy said four survivors and one of the dead were found in a boat, while three other survivors and a body were found in the water.

All were working for Houston-based Geokinetics Inc. on a liftboat owned by Trinity Liftboat Services based in New Iberia, Louisiana. All four U.S. citizens were from the New Iberia area, including Reed, who is the son of liftboat company owner Randy Reed.

The oil workers called for help Thursday afternoon in the middle of Tropical Storm Nate, which disabled their vessel, the Trinity II, a 94-foot (29-meter), 185-ton liftboat, that can lower legs to the sea floor and then elevate itself above the water level. It was being used as a recording vessel and housing for the crew, and it was in waters about 25 feet (8 meters) deep.

They abandoned the liftboat about eight miles (13 kilometers) offshore of the port of Frontera in the southeastern Mexican state of Tabasco.

Pemex and the Mexican navy led the search by air and sea, which intensified Saturday as the storm moved west toward the coast of Veracruz state. A dozen fishermen also disappeared aboard two shrimp boats in the Gulf during the storm Friday.

Pemex said the search for the oil workers continued with four boats, four Pemex helicopters and two airplanes making overflights.

3 years ago

Bangladeshi Oil Worker Dies in Mexico Hospital

CIUDAD DEL CARMEN, Mexico (AP) - A Bangladeshi oil worker has died in the hospital after being rescued from three days drifting in the Gulf of Mexico, Mexico's state oil company said Monday.

An official for Petroleos Mexicanos, or Pemex, said Kham Nadimuzzaman of Bangladesh died Sunday night.

The official could not be named because he was not authorized to speak to the news media.

Nadimuzzaman was among 10 missing oil workers, seven of whom were found alive Sunday, three days after evacuating their disabled rig in a tropical storm and escaping in an enclosed life raft.

Two bodies also were found but have yet to be identified. Rescuers are searching for one worker of the original 10 who remains missing.

The official said Nadimuzzaman arrived to the hospital in very grave condition. The other survivors are stable, he said.

Pemex identified the other survivors as two U.S. citizens, Jeremy Parfait and Ted Derise, Jr., both of Louisiana; and Mexicans Ruben Velasquez, Eleaquin Lopez, Luis Escobar and Ruben Lopez Villalobos.

They were found 50 miles (80 kilometers) off the coast of the Gulf state of Campeche by the ship Bourbon Artavaze and taken by helicopter to the Campeche port city of Ciudad del Carmen, where they were admitted to a Pemex regional hospital.

The fate of the other two Americans, identified previously as Louisiana residents Craig Myers and Nick Reed, was still not clear Monday.

The Mexican navy said four survivors and one of the dead were found in a boat, while three other survivors and a body were found in the water.

All were working for Houston-based Geokinetics Inc. on a liftboat owned by Trinity Liftboat Services based in New Iberia, Louisiana. All four U.S. citizens were from the New Iberia area, including Reed, who is the son of liftboat company owner Randy Reed.

The oil workers called for help Thursday afternoon in the middle of Tropical Storm Nate, which disabled their vessel, the Trinity II, a 94-foot (29-meter), 185-ton liftboat, that can lower legs to the sea floor and then elevate itself above the water level. It was being used as a recording vessel and housing for the crew, and it was in waters about 25 feet (8 meters) deep.

They abandoned the liftboat about eight miles (13 kilometers) offshore of the port of Frontera in the southeastern Mexican state of Tabasco.

Pemex and the Mexican navy led the search by air and sea, which intensified Saturday as the storm moved west toward the coast of Veracruz state. A dozen fishermen also disappeared aboard two shrimp boats in the Gulf during the storm Friday.

Pemex said the search for the oil workers continued with four boats, four Pemex helicopters and two airplanes making overflights.

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3 years ago

Another Offshore Worker Dies Following Storm

One of the rescued offshore workers has died at the hospital, bringing the total to 3 dead and one missing. According to MSNBC, Kham Nadimuzzaman of Bangladesh died Sunday night. The official for Petroleos Mexicanos, or Pemex, could not be named because he was not authorized to speak to the news media. The official said Nadimuzzaman arrived to the hospital in very grave condition. The other survivors are stable, he said.
Those survivors include Jeremy Parfait of Houma and Ted Derise, Jr. of New Iberia.
Among the deceased/missing are New Iberia natives Craig Myers and Nick Reed. Still no official word on the identities of the bodies found.

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3 years ago

7 Oil Workers Found Alive in Gulf of Mexico

VERACRUZ, Mexico (AP) - Seven of 10 oil workers missing in the Gulf of Mexico were found alive Sunday, according to Mexico's state oil company, three days after evacuating their disabled rig in a tropical storm and escaping in an enclosed life raft.

Two bodies also were found but have yet to be identified, and rescuers are still searching for one worker who remains missing, Petroleos Mexicanos, or Pemex, said in a statement.

Pemex identified the survivors as two Americans, Jeremy Parfait and Ted Derise, Jr., both of Louisiana, Kham Nadimuzzaman of Bangladesh and Mexicans Ruben Velasquez, Eleaquin Lopez, Luis Escobar and Ruben Lopez Villalobos.

They were found 51 miles (82 kilometers) off the coast of the gulf state of Campeche by the ship Bourbon Artavaze and taken by helicopter to the Campeche port city of Ciudad del Carmen, where they were admitted to a Pemex regional hospital.

The fate of the other two Americans, who have been identified previously as Craig Myers and Nick Reed, also of Louisiana, was not clear late Sunday.

The oil company and the Mexican Navy, which assisted in the search and rescue, provided no other immediate details. It was not known how the survivors and bodies were found or whether they were still in the life boat. There was also no word on the condition of
the survivors.

All were working for Houston-based Geokinetics Inc. on a liftboat owned by Trinity Liftboat Services based in New Iberia, Louisiana. All four Americans were from the New Iberia area, including Reed, who is the son of liftboat company owner Randy Reed.

Geokinetics spokeswoman Brenda Taquino could not reached for comment Sunday night.

A woman who answered the phone at Trinity Lifeboat Services said the company can't confirm details about the workers being found.

A girl who answered the telephone at the home of Ted Allen Derise Sr. said she was the sister of the rig worker but wouldn't give her name.

"It's good news to us but we're still praying for the other people," she said.

The oil workers called for help Thursday afternoon in the middle of Tropical Storm Nate, which disabled their vessel, the Trinity II, a 94-foot (29-meter), 185-ton liftboat, that can lower legs to the sea floor and then elevate itself above the water level. This
one was being used as a recording vessel and housing for the crew, and it was in waters about 25 feet (8 meters) deep.

Pemex and the Mexican navy led the search by air and sea, which intensified Saturday as the storm moved west toward the coast of Veracruz. A dozen fishermen who disappeared aboard two shrimp boats on Friday in the gulf during the storm.

Nate weakened to a tropical depression Sunday over Mexico's Gulf coast, where officials opened shelters as a precaution but said the storm was having little impact.

Nate made landfall as a tropical storm on Sunday north of Barra de Nautla in the state of Veracruz, where Gov. Javier Duarte said there were no reports of damage or injuries and rivers remained below risk level.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami said that by Sunday evening Nate had weakened to a depression with 35 mph (55 kph) winds and was expected to dissipate by Monday.

On Sunday evening, Nate's center was located about 30 miles (50 kilometers) south-southwest of Tuxpan, Mexico and was moving west-northwest at 8 mph (13 kph).

Of more than 2,200 shelters set up in Veracruz state, only two were in use, housing little more than 50 people, civil protection authorities said. In the city of Antigua, Mayor Arturo Navarrete told radio station XEU that there was light rain and very little wind.

In the Caribbean on Sunday, Tropical Storm Maria was centered about 105 miles (170 kilometers) northeast of San Juan, Puerto Rico, with winds that had strengthened to 60 mph (95 kph). The hurricane center said it was moving northwest at about 10 mph (17
kph), toward the open Atlantic.

In Puerto Rico, there were no reports of any damage or flooding from Maria.

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3 years ago

ID's On The Offshore Workers Found Alive

According to a release by PEMAX, The seven people found alive include 2 from Louisiana. They're identified as Ted Derise of New Iberia and Jeremy Parfait of Houma. Others found alive are identified as Kham Nadimuzzaman (Bangladesh), Rubén Velásquez (México), Eleaquín López (México), Luis Escobar (México), Rubén López Villalobos (México). The two bodies have not yet been identified, nor the missing person.

LINK TO OFFICIAL PEMAX PRESS RELEASE

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3 years ago

7 of 10 Missing Offshore Workers Found Alive

Seven of 10 oil workers missing in the Gulf of Mexico were found alive Sunday after three days at sea, according to Mexico's state oil company.

Petroleos Mexicanos said in the statement that two bodies also were found but have yet to be identified and one worker remains missing.

The survivors were four Mexicans, two Americans and a worker from Bangladesh, the statement said. They were found 51 miles (82 kilometers) off the coast of the gulf state of Campeche. Their identities have not yet been released.

The employees of Houston-based Geokinetics Inc. called for help Thursday afternoon after evacuating to an enclosed life raft in the middle of Tropical Storm Nate, which disabled their vessel, a liftboat called the Trinity II.

By E. EDUARDO CASTILLO Associated Press

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3 years ago

Missing Offshore Workers: Timeline of Events

Geokinetics Timeline of Events:

  • Tropical Storm Nate approached Bay of Campeche Wednesday evening September 7, 2011
  • Thursday morning, September 8, 2011 Geokinetics learns of disabled liftboat; the Trinity II owned by Trinity Liftboat Services (New Iberia, LA)
  • Thursday, around noon, the liftboat captain communicated crew was abandoning the liftboat and boarding a life raft
  • Search for ten people -- four Trinity crewmembers, three Geokinetics employees and three independent contractors. Marine authority leading rescue efforts
  • Rescue efforts initially hampered by the inclement weather
  • Weather conditions improved Friday afternoon
  • Rescue efforts ramped up as tropical storm moves westward
  • Several boats, five helicopters and one plane mobilized Friday afternoon
  • Geokinetics continues to be in touch with the families of employees and contractors
  • Weather has improved significantly as of Saturday morning, September 10, 2011 allowing rescue efforts to intensify
  • Trinity II has been secured and it was confirmed, as reported, that the crew did indeed abandon the liftboat

Link to Geokinetics Timeline

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3 years ago

Crew Still Missing; Trinity II is Found

From upstreamonline.com: Mexican state oil company Pemex has found the hobbled and partially submerged 94-foot, 185-ton Trinity II liftboat in the Bay of Campeche.
However, there are as yet no signs of the lifeboat holding ten offshore workers and crew members, according to media reports in Mexico.

The Trinity Liftboat Services-owned vessel was disabled in high winds and waves on Thursday as Tropical Storm Nate approached the Bay of Campeche in the Gulf of Mexico.

Mexican media reported that the Third Naval Region confirmed that Pemex encountered the vessel as part of the search and rescue effort to find the missing oil workers, who had abandoned the liftboat when one of the jacking legs buckled and the jack up-style offshore unit listed into the gulf.

Pemex is drawing up plans to tow the damaged rig back to port. Officials in Mexico say the search continues for the missing workers.

LINK TO FULL ARTICLE

RELATED ARTICLE: Super Puma Joins in Search for Trinity II Crew

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3 years ago

Father of Missing Offshore Workers Talks

Mexican officials are searching for ten offshore workers who've been missing since Thursday.
They're using five helicopters, a fixed-wing plane and two vessels to search for the men in the Bay of Campeche where Tropical Storm Nate caused commotion.
Of the ten men missing, three are from New Iberia and one from Houma.
Craig Myers, Jeremy Parfait of Houma, Reed's son Nick Reed, and Ted Derise Jr are the missing men.

Randy Reed, the president of Trinity Liftboat Services, says his son, Nick Reed are one of the missing men.
Reed hasn't heard from them since they abandoned their liftboat Thursday afternoon around 12:25.
Investigators say the crew was on the Trinity Two Liftboat when one of the legs gave way.
When the captain called for everyone to abandon the sinking vessel, the crew boarded a lifeboat equipped with food and other amenities built for survival.
Reed says as a father and boss he's very concerned about them, but he says he has faith that they are ok.

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3 years ago

Stranded Boat Spotted Not the LifeBoat

Update: Trinity officials just called the KATC newsroom to report the boat spotted in the Gulf was not the lifeboat; they say it is a boat with a canopy. Family members had said they were told by the company that the vessel was the lifeboat and that they would reach it by 11:00. The company, however, says it is not and the search continues. We'll keep you updated.

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3 years ago

Update: Search for Missing Offshore Workers

Five helicopters, a fixed-wing plane and two vessels are searching for ten missing offshore workers in Mexico, according to Geokinetics spokesperson, Brenda Taquino. Geokinetics contracted the liftboat from Trinity Liftboat Services, LLC in New Iberia. One of the legs of the Trinity II liftboat was damaged, the ten men on board abandoned the sinking vessel around 12:25 p.m. Thursday. Four of the ten men missing in the Gulf are employed by Trinity Liftboat Services. The men are identified as Jeremy Parfait of Houma, Craig Myers, Ted Derise Jr., and Nick Reed. Reed's father, Randy Reed, is also the President of Trinity Liftboat Services, LLC in New Iberia.

Someone on a boat in the distance noticed one of the Trinity II workers abandoning the vessel and jumping into the lifeboat. The lifeboat has yet to be spotted by searchers. The other six workers are employed by other companies - three are Geokinetics employees, and the other three are other contractors. Geokinitics is not disclosing the contractors' employer.

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3 years ago

Four of Ten Missing From Louisiana

Four of the ten men missing in the Gulf are employed by Trinity Liftboat Services, LLC in New Iberia. The men are identified as Jeremy Parfait of Houma, Craig Myers, Ted Derise Jr., and Nick Reed all of New Iberia. Reed's father, Randy Reed, is also the President of Trinity Liftboat Services, LLC in New Iberia. Reed says that the missing ten men abandoned the sinking vessel, Trinity II yesterday and boarded a lifeboat equipped with food and other amenities built for survival. Reed says he feels confident that they will be found and they are relying on updates from the Mexican Navy who are performing the search. Reed says the other six workers are employed by Geokinetics out of Houston.

Pictured from left are: Craig Myers, Jeremy Parfait, Nick Reed and Ted Derise Jr.

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3 years ago

Mexican Oil Company Says Workers Employed by Houston-Based Geokinetics

Mexico's state oil company said Friday it was searching for 10 workers from a Texas-based company who evacuated from a platform in the Gulf of Mexico ahead of Tropical Storm Nate.

Petroleos Mexicanos said it has two ships searching in the area where the workers, employed by Houston-based Geokinetics Inc. called for help Thursday afternoon after leaving a "jack-up" structure, the Trinity II, on an evacuation vessel.

Victor Manuel Perez, captain of the port of Frontera, only could confirm that the majority of the missing are foreigners.

Geokinetics specializes in seismic studies for the oil and gas industry.

Pemex said its ships couldn't reach the area about 8 miles (13 kilometers) off shore of the southeastern Mexican state of Tabasco because of high winds and waves.

Tropical Storm Nate was drifting slowly northwestward over the southern Gulf Friday with maximum sustained winds of near 65 mph (100 kph), according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami. It was centered about 140 miles (225 kilometers) west of Campeche. Forecasters said it was expected to become a hurricane later Friday or Saturday and hit Mexico's Gulf Coast Sunday or Monday.

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3 years ago

Search Underway for Missing Rig Workers Amid Increasing Wind and Waves from Tropical Storm Nate

Mexican state-run oil company Pemex said search and rescue efforts were underway for 10 offshore workers who had abandoned a damaged liftboat in the Bay of Campeche after Tropical Storm Nate cut a devastating path in the Gulf of Mexico.

Authorities ordered an evacuation of the Trinity II liftboat as meteorological conditions deteriorated Thursday afternoon.

According to Pemex, fissures were detected in the jacking legs of the liftboat and reports indicate the liftboat may have partially sunk.

Pemex said four of the ten offshore workers were the liftboat's crew members.

According to Pemex, the offshore workers had not been located as of 2131 GMT, but Mexican media reported two rescue vessels were due to arrive shortly.

The Trinity II is understood to be under contract with Geokinetics, the seismic company shooting a 3D survey in the Tsimin Tojual project.

Trinity Liftboat Services in December won a contract with Geokinetics for vessel support on a project in the Bay of Campeche.

Both the Trinity I and Trinity II have been contracted to support the project through its completion in 2012. Geokinetics could not be reached for comment.

Trinity Liftboat, when reached by Upstream, said it had no comment.

Pemex said it was continuing to provide aid in the search for the missing workers, but efforts have been hampered by gale-force winds and up to 20 meter-high waves.

Tropical Storm Nate, the 14th named storm in the hurricane season, was gaining strength and could become a hurricane on Friday or Saturday, the US National Hurricane Center said.

Source: http://www.upstreamonline.com/live/article277355.ece

3 years ago

Mexican Navy Search for 10 Workers Off Rig

The Mexican Navy is searching for ten offshore workers after their rig is damaged in the midst of Tropical Storm Nate.
The Navy tells the U.S. Coast Guard, the workers were on board the Trinity II as the storm strengthened in the Bay of Campeche in the southern Gulf.
No word on the extent of damage.
So far, one Iberia Parish family has contacted us saying their loved ones were on that rig and they haven't heard from them.

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